A Tract from the book  'THE LEGENDARY JOE MEEK' (The Telstar Man) written by JOHN REPSCH

 

............A few days later there was another new twist.  An American disc jockey,  Ed  Verschure,  from the  WHTC   radio station in Michegan, had been in contact during the past few months and on January 24  flew over to London to meet him.   Verschure was enthralled by some of the music Joe had turned out   -  especially     THE BLUE RONDOS'  'LITTLE BABY'    -   and urged him to help set up a joint record label soley for the American market.  Recordings would be produced at Holloway Road, shipped over and distributed by a major company on their own personal label.

             Despite having agreed to the exclusive EMI deal. Joe still had thoughts for this one! He was fascinated by the idea of having his own label and during their discussions at the studio,  at  Mr Ginnett's  and whilst eating out, he matched Verschure's valiant efforts by trying his best to find faith in him.  But as the week progressed he grew more and more wary, admitting sadly at the end that he had been hurt too many times by people walking off with his ideas, and that though he wanted to trust him, he did not trust record companies and could not risk giving him a new master tape to hawk around in case it was stolen.  He was still interested, but sent him home disappointed with some old masters instead...............

 

 N.B - INCREDIBLE AS IT MAY SEEM TODAY IN THE 21 CENTURY  -   NOT ONE OF THE BLUE RONDOS  (IN 1965)  HAD ACCESS TO A TELEPHONE   - AND THEREFORE  NONE OF THE BAND WERE  LISTED  IN  THE   'LONDON'  TELEPHONE DIRECTORIES.

      JOE MEEK DENIED ED VERSCHURE ANY CONTACT WITH THE BAND  -  AND THOUGH HE TRIED   -   HE HAD NO WAY OF CONTACTING ANY OF THE MEMBERS  -  THE FIRST WE EVER HEARD OF THE MATTER  WAS 30 YEARS LATER  -  FROM   JOHN REPSCH........Behind our backs........

 

              ''John Repsch's exhaustively researched biography adds a significant and highly entertaining
                chapter to the history of post-war British pop culture.''  -  
                                                                                                 Richard Williams, features editor. 
'The Times'.

 

                JOE MEEK  was a mystery. He was Britain's  first  independent  pop record producer
                 and one of the most important figures in that fabulous decade of the Sixties music.

                 Hated by his rivals for his secrecy and succces. he became Britain's top producer.
                  For the first time, after 4 years' research, the life of this extraodinary man is now
                  revealed. It is one of the most bizarre stories to emerge from the Sixties music scene.